Naples Art Association’s Show of Shows highlights and awards local artists

Show of Shows opening

The 6th Annual Non-Juried All Artist Members Show of Shows Exhibition opened on Friday, Sept. 6, 2013 with an exciting preview reception at the von Liebig Art Center. Hundreds of people attended and helped choose the award winners, officiated by the Collier County Elections Office. You can view photos of selected images from the show the Naples Art Association website.

Once all the votes were counted, the following artists took home cash and donated awards sponsored by Koenig Art Emporium, Blick Art Materials and David and Joan Fuller. Levi Hayes wins Best of Show with 4.8% of the votes.

Best of Show – $200

Artist: Levi Hayes  Artwork: Hamsa Hand 1, plaster, acrylic and resin on canvas

First Place – $100 Koenig Art Emporium Gift Certificate

Artist: Yurline Franklin  Artwork: The Observer, acrylic on canvas

Award of Merit – $100

Artist: Joel Shapses  Artwork: The Agony and the Ecstasy, black chlorite sculpture

Honorable Mention – $50 Blick Art Materials Gift Certificate

Artist: Dennis Gormley  Artwork: White Horse, pen and ink

Honorable Mention – $50 Blick Art Materials Gift Certificate

Artist: Wanda Kemper  Artwork: Everglades at Dusk, Serenity, oil on canvas

Honorable Mention – $50 Blick Art Materials Gift Certificate

Artist: Nic Provenzo  Artwork: Inappropriate, photograph

There was a nine-way tie for the $50 Honorable Mention award sponsored by David and Joan Fuller. Additional funds have been donated and each of the nine artists received $25.

1)    Tania Begg  Artwork: “MAD” Michelangelo’s David, acrylic on canvas

2)    Julieta de Palacios  Artwork: Untitled 2013.5, oil

3)    Barbara Groenteman Collaborative Artwork: Summer Bloom, Plumeria Rubra, Jeannie Moragne, watercolor on paper

4)    Raud Johnson  Artwork: Lettering a Torah, oil on canvas

5)    Patty Kane  Collaborative Artwork:  Summer Bloom, Plumeria Rubra, Jeannie Moragne, watercolor on paper

6)    Sandee Kozlow  Artwork: I Still Feel It, acrylic and mixed media

7)    Dawn Lutz  Artwork: HARMONY in Platinum, steel metal sculpture

8)    Michael Moukios  Artwork: White Pelicans, acrylic

9)    David W. Sussman  Artwork: American Rose, photograph

Show of Shows will be on view at The Naples Art Association (NAA) at the von Liebig Art Center through Nov. 9, 2013. 

Alongside the Show of Shows, visitors can see Dimensions in Art presented by the Southwest Florida Fine Craft Guild, juried by artist Muffy Clark Gill. Dimensions in Art will be on view through Oct. 4, 2013.

NAA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, operates The von Liebig Art Center, located at 585 Park Street in downtown Naples. Founded in 1954 by local artists, its mission is to educate and promote visual arts in Southwest Florida. Through its programs, the Naples Art Association is dedicated to serving individual artists of all ages and skill levels, along their creative journeys. It’s open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturdays in season. For more information, please call 239-262-6517, visit http://naplesart.org.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Naples Art Association: Mary Mariner

Mary Mariner 2013 Inside the Artists Studio

Artist Mary Mariner remembers the Naples Art Association from earlier days. When she and her husband began travelling here as seasonal residents in 1992, one of the first things she did was to seek out the art community. She wanted a place to learn and create art and a place to meet others with similar passions. She found the Naples Art Association, and has been a member ever since.

With her newfound dedicated community of fellow artists she explored new creative territory, and just two years later, she decided she’d like to live here permanently. When she shopping for a home in Naples, she sought one with great studio space.

Mary Mariner stores beautiful finished canvases alongside one wall of her studio.

Mary Mariner stores beautiful finished canvases alongside one wall of her studio.

Her townhome in Naples includes a 500 sq. ft. working art studio, which is flooded with natural light and filled with her artwork. A couch and chair with a coffee table full of magazines sits on one side and bins of collage materials and finished paintings behind her easel and paints are set up on the other side. A closet across the way holds books by artists who inspire her. The walls of her home in every room are filled with artwork. “Art makes me happy,” she said.

Mary Mariner’s home is filled with her artwork even from the entrance. This gorgeous piece wows guests at the top of the stairs. Her studio is at the end of the hallway shown here.

Mary Mariner’s home is filled with her artwork even from the entrance. This gorgeous piece wows guests at the top of the stairs. Her studio is at the end of the hallway shown here.

Mary Mariner helped to bring in inspirational travelling artists to teach workshops and also personally taught classes for the Naples Art Association. She remembers Carol Barnes, Charles Movalli, Wolfe Kahn and especially Mary Todd Beam for the lessons and tips they shared.

Mariner taught art classes and helped arrange special guest artist workshops with the Naples Art Association at the Naples Depot. She still has the paper attendance records.

Mariner taught art classes and helped arrange special guest artist workshops with the Naples Art Association at the Naples Depot. She still has the paper attendance records.

They’ve all influenced her style in some way, she says. Mariner describes her painting as experimental art. She started out working in oil painting, then later with watercolor and charcoal techniques. No matter which medium, she lets herself get absorbed by the colors and emotions of her art. She builds on a piece, adding a fleck of light here and playing with texture. “Sometimes amazing things happen!” she said.

She still collects interesting paper from secondhand stores and other sources to be used in her work. She saves it in this bin in her studio.

She still collects interesting paper from secondhand stores and other sources to be used in her work. She saves it in this bin in her studio.

She recalls the time she participated in Art in the Park with the Naples Art Association. “I took about eight paintings or so with me. We leaned them against the trees for buyers to see. I sold five or six of them!”  She has also been a part of Naples Art Association Members’ Gallery shows and the Naples National Art Festival. Through her participation with the NAA, Mariner’s work was discovered by a curator for Gallery One (when it was located on 13th Street in Naples), and they were one of the first galleries to accept her work for representation.

Mariner talks about the golden accent that she used in this artwork to add an additional layer to her design. She’s also experimented with texture, using gesso and other materials to create a three-dimensional affect in her art.

Mariner talks about the golden accent that she used in this artwork to add an additional layer to her design. She’s also experimented with texture, using gesso and other materials to create a three-dimensional affect in her art.

Before moving to Naples, Mariner lived in Baltimore, Maryland. It was where she first fell in love with art. In high school, she had a Thursday class in art, and she anticipated it eagerly each week. She later studied fine art at Cantonsville Community College and Western Maryland College.

Fondly recalling trips to Italy and elsewhere with her late husband, Richard. She would take photos and paint scenes of the beautiful places she’d travelled. She’s worked within themes and has a full series of paintings that incorporate antique sheet music in collage with paint.

Fondly recalling trips to Italy and elsewhere with her late husband, Richard. She would take photos and paint scenes of the beautiful places she’d travelled. She’s worked within themes and has a full series of paintings that incorporate antique sheet music in collage with paint.

Art has always been a part of Mary’s life, though it hasn’t always taken a front seat. She took some time after college to focus on raising her three children. As soon as she could, she sought out art instructor Luigi “Gino” Manneli, who was known for his use of color and light, to get back into painting and to keep learning. Recently, she is coming off of a seven-year break, and is excited about getting back into her studio with more enthusiasm.

Become a member of the Naples Art Association and sign up for classes and workshops.

Hollingsworth to donate artwork to Naples Art Association collection

Kelly Hollingsworth in her Naples art studio.

Kelly Hollingsworth in her Naples art studio.

Meet Kelly Hollingsworth. Her artwork will soon be added to the Naples Art Association’s collection.

A dynamic artist and sought-after art teacher, Hollingsworth lives in Naples full-time and has for more than a decade. When she talks about her work, she lights up. “I am a constructionist. In my process, I collect objects, imagery and emotions. Some of my images have a familiar feel using important iconography, paying homage to my predecessors in art history,” Hollingsworth said.

On Tuesday, May 14, members of the Naples Art Association Collection Committee visited Kelly Hollingsworth in her Naples studio. Pictured here: Marilyn Crawford and Eve May

On Tuesday, May 14, members of the Naples Art Association Collection Committee visited Kelly Hollingsworth in her Naples studio. Pictured here: Marilyn Crawford and Eve May

The NAA Collection Committee visited her Naples’ studio to ask her about donating to the 60-year-old nonprofit’s holdings, which include art created after 1950 by artists who have lived in or had a connection to Florida. Hollingsworth heartily agreed.

Her piece, which will be completed soon, is a mixed media assemblage featuring her distinctive dress motif assembled with photographic images and a selection of her journal writings. Personal elements like this help Hollingsworth identify with her images, as they collectively serve as a representation of her ideas and emotions over the years. “I try to make the invisible visible and use parts of the self that would be viewed as distasteful into something beautiful. My work is a combination of visually provocative, still images, almost like a film clip,” said Hollingsworth.

Kelly Hollingsworth - 8 Dresses

8 Dresses by Kelly Hollingsworth. This piece is an example of her artistic style. She created it for a Naples Art Association outdoor art exhibit along Fifth Avenue South during the summer of 2012

Hollingsworth is a graduate of the Columbus College of Art and Design in Ohio and she has played an important role in the Naples Art Association’s education program over the years. She teaches two ARTScool classes this summer, Open Studio and Advanced Pop Art.

Coming this fall, she is beginning a new class with the Naples Art Association geared toward helping high school aged artists develop and organize their portfolio in preparation for growing their future creative careers.

Like us and stay in touch with the Naples Art Association on Facebook.

A closer look at the Naples Art Association show “Words, Signs and Symbols”

By Kristine Meek, assistant director of the Harmon Meek Gallery and juror of the Naples Art Association exhibition, Words, Signs and Symbols. 

Art at its very basic, unifying foundation is a visual conveyance of a story or message. Words, signs and symbols are the tools mankind has used to visually tell our story for millennia. But the meaning of words, signs, and symbols is determined by the viewer and as the viewer changes over time and varies over cultures, the meaning can change.

This Naples Art Association member exhibition contains a fine collection of works in a variety of media, all containing some combination of words, symbols and signs. I love how under a single theme there can be so much variety and so many stories told visually through the talents of the Naples Art Association members. I look forward to touring the exhibition with others to observe how other people interpret the story or message of each work. Everyone who looks at these works on the walls and in the corridors and lobby will view and interpret the piece based on what the signs, words and symbols mean to each person.

Betsy Gandy, Road Kill, Best of Show in Words, Signs and Symbols at the von Liebig Art Center

Betsy Gandy, Road Kill, mixed media, 2012. Best of Show in the Naples Art Association’s Words, Signs and Symbols exhibition at the von Liebig Art Center

From cave drawings to Jim Dine – yes, I’m comparing the pop artist to Neanderthals – whether it’s a big red heart or a big hairy bison, symbols are used in art to convey a message to the viewer. Symbols help to visually tell a story. The work I selected for Best in Show (which I have to laugh at myself for picking a work that contained a dog to win such a title), “Roadkill” is an example of symbols conveying a story. To me, the dog was a symbol of loyalty; the piece of black tire, a symbol of death; and the green grass, a symbol of healing.

When thinking of symbols in art, religious art comes to mind. I think of the medieval cathedrals’ stained glass windows that could tell Bible stories to illiterate congregations. Many of the works in this exhibition contain religious symbols. The work, “Eat, Pray, Love” that received one of the juror’s awards was a photograph depiction of a cross found in a kitchen in a small restaurant in Mexico. The cross is a long standing religious symbol revered by over half the world’s population. In this crucifix common kitchen utensils have been nailed to the cross – the rust is a symbol of blood; the forks are symbols of hunger. The photograph received the award, not just for the subject of the cross but also for the interesting composition – slightly off center and cropped to include a bit of the kitchen’s cliché wallpaper, with two of the edges extending beyond the composition.

Mary Love, Eat Pray Love, Jurors Choice Award

Mary Love, Eat Pray Love, digital photograph on aluminum, 2011. Juror’s Choice Award in the Naples Art Association’s Words, Signs and Symbols exhibition at The von Liebig Art Center

Portraits from earlier eras in this country and in Europe used symbols to tell the viewer about the sitter – a book symbolizing that the subject was educated; objects in the background, foreground and on the figure were hints to the sitter’s occupation, temperament, and achievements. While not a portrait, but to me reminiscent of one, “Bad Advice” made me stop and smile as I walked the room selecting works for this show. Even from across the room, “Bad Advice” made me chuckle. Thinking about the elements of the work: the purple knit beanie, the glazed eyes, the marijuana cigarette, the sign and ironic poultry; I image this man’s story.

David Fuller, Bad Advice, First Place in the Naples Art Association Words, Signs and Symbols exhibition at The von Liebig Art Center

David Fuller, Bad Advice, acrylic on board, 2012. First Place in the Naples Art Association’s Words, Signs and Symbols exhibition at The von Liebig Art Center

When I think of words in art I think of Dada artists like Hannah Hoch and of Robert Indiana’s “Love.” Words and letters can be manipulated graphically to show an old message in a new way. The work “Hortus Meus” that I gave one of the juror’s awards to was, to me, an interesting manipulation of an old idea. In these two paintings of orchid species the artist has included the Latin name for the plant, just like in an illustration by J.J. Audubon or an 18th century print, but this work is done with contemporary sensibilities and a contemporary font for the Latin text.

Marie Kinnear, Hortus Meus, Juror's Choice Award

Marie Kinnear, Hortus Meus, (diptych), mixed media, 2012. Juror’s Choice Award, in the Naples Art Association’s Words, Signs and Symbols exhibition at The von Liebig Art Center

The final part of the trifecta that is the theme of this exhibition is Signs. Signs in art are often subject matter in Pop Art, Neo-dadaism, and contemporary art made of found materials. “Chicken Feed” done in pastel has a more traditional, realism perspective and I appreciated that the theme of signs in art was represented not as Pop or modernism, but in pastel with a traditional sense of perspective and realist quality.

Tanya Trinkaus Glass, Chicken Feed, Juror's Choice Award in the Naples Art Association Words, Signs and Symbols exhibition at The von Liebig Art Center

Tanya Trinkaus Glass, Chicken Feed, pastel on paper, 2013. Juror’s Choice Award in the Naples Art Association’s Words, Signs and Symbols exhibition at The von Liebig Art Center

I wavered on including the purely abstract works but then thought about color as a symbol, so included those works in the exhibition. The works I excluded were ones I personally found less stimulating – their meaning and story were too obvious to me and they didn’t get me to want to explore more. I did include all the 3-dimensional works because I found them to be interesting for their variety of media and I enjoyed the clever use of materials some artists used for executing their concept.

This group exhibition contains everything from digital photography to pottery, from collage to colored pencil, from encaustic to natural materials, and oil, watercolor, acrylic, pastel, and pen. Styles of work vary from realism to abstract, conceptual to concrete, and from humorous to mournful. The messages and stories told through these works include encouragement, irony, religious beliefs, ancestral and cultural heritage, new experiences, new points of view, happiness in unlikely places, discord, and commentary on society, just to name a few. The works that resonated and had meaning to me, may not to you, or may not in the same way, and that’s what makes this show so challenging and so wonderful.

Kristine Meek

Kristine Meek

The Naples Art Association exhibition, “Words, Signs and Symbols” is on view through June 1, 2013 at The von Liebig Art Center in Naples.

Admission is free, but donations are accepted to support the nonprofit services and programming of the Naples Art Association.

The Naples Art Association’s April 2013 in Photos

April brought more than showers to Naples! Starting the month off was a reception for the season’s final Naples Art Association Members Gallery 2D/3D show. Art in the Park wrapped another fabulous season, a two new exhibitions moved in, several organizations held gatherings at the art center, One of our exhibiting artists held a special workshop for one of our sponsors, Vi at Bentely Village and more. Check out the gallery of April images by clicking through the photos below. Leave us your comments on your favorite photo!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Naples Art Association Members Gallery 2D/3D show in last days

The final show of the season for the Naples Art Association Members Gallery is on view for only a few days more during regular hours (currently Monday-Saturday 10 to 4) at the von Liebig Art Center.

The Members Gallery 2D/3D Show closes on Saturday, April 27, 2013. It will also be open during the preview reception Friday, April 26, 2013 from 5:30 p.m to 7:30 p.m. It’s free to members and only $10 for nonmembers to attend. Two new shows will also be on view: La Casa: Latin American Art and another great members show, Words, Signs and Symbols.

While you’re perusing, look for these pieces, recognized by jurors for three special awards.

Tania Begg won the Innovation/Experimentation Award for her work, "Ladies Man." Photo Credit: Constance Parry

Tania Begg won the Innovation/Experimentation Award for her work, “Ladies Man.” Photo Credit: Constance Parry

Leigh Herndon won the Technical Achievement award for her Rozome silk piece, "Dance." Photo credit: Constance Parry

Leigh Herndon won the Technical Achievement award for her Rozome silk piece, “Dance.” Photo credit: Constance Parry

Nancy Shelly won the award for Bold Spontaneity/Expressive Power with her work "Sunflowers." Photo credit: Constance Parry

Nancy Shelly won the award for Bold Spontaneity/Expressive Power with her work “Sunflowers.” Photo credit: Constance Parry

This season, the Naples Art Association awarded more than $600 to member artists in cash prizes for their achievements and nearly 200 works of art were shown this year in the Members’ Gallery exhibitions alone!

At a special reception held Friday, April 5 for the Members’ Gallery’s new 2D/3D show, all member artists of the Naples Art Association were honored for their participation and talent.

Members Gallery volunteer managers Betty Cioffi and Constance Parry were recognized as was Dave Fuller for his creative eye and talent for hanging each of the Members’ Gallery shows.

The Naples Art Association, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, was founded in 1954 by local artists with a mission  to educate and promote visual arts in Southwest Florida. Through its programs, the Naples Art Association is dedicated to serving individual artists of all ages and skill levels, along their creative journeys. The NAA operates The von Liebig Art Center, located at 585 Park Street in downtown Naples. It’s open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturdays in season. For more information, please call 239-262-6517, visit http://naplesart.org.

Like the Naples Art Association on Facebook to see more photos from its events.

Naples Art Association inaugural gala sets the stage for upcoming 60th Anniversary

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

More than 150 guests enjoyed a special French-themed evening for the benefit of the Naples Art Association On February 20, opening the 34th Annual Naples National Art Festival weekend. French music, beverages and cuisine set the mood for a themed evening, “Bleu Moon Over the Seine.”

NAA member artists demonstrated their talents as guests strolled around the Naples Sailing and Yacht Club sipping French wines and Kir Royales, the drink invented in Lyons to celebrate the U.S. liberation of that city during World War II. A French chanteur, Michelet Innocent, performed a variety of smoky French bistro classics. The evening was capped with a live auction of a dozen works of art donated by previous winners of Naples National events. A professional auctioneer from Leslie Hindman Auctioneers insured that bidding was enthusiastic, quick and widespread.

The Platinum Donor for the event was artnet AG. In addition, many individuals subscribed to patron tables, underwriting early expenses. In all, the inaugural event netted about $25,000 for NAA programs, including the children’s art scholarship program and community outreach. Many volunteers assisted with logistics helping to make the whole experience smooth and enjoyable.

This was the first event of its kind for NAA, and it has helped the organization prepare to throw an even bigger celebration for its 60th Diamond Anniversary event on Feb. 20, 2014. Stay tuned for more exciting announcements and activities in the works.

Individuals interested in volunteering on the 2014 gala committee should contact John Hushon.